Martha Gipson

 

Having been raised in the Midwest, Martha Gipson spent childhood days exploring woods, creeks, springs and clear lakes. Her passion for water, trees and skies is evocative of her childhood emotions and memories. 

Her waterfall series based on Iguazu Falls, as well as her swimmer series, based on her experience as a competitive swimmer, reflect this love of water, which seems to magically appear in almost all of her work, wittingly or unwittingly.

Martha lived in Dallas for many years where she established her career as an artist. Through the years, she studied painting and drawing under Ann Cushing Gantz, Chong Chu, Connie Connally, Carolyn Anderson, Marla Ziegler, and Chancellor Page, in Dallas and at various en plein air locations in Texas, New Mexico and California. Her artwork is in the collections of patrons nationally as well as in Canada.

Also a painting teacher, Martha initiated and established art programs at Austin Street Shelter and Planned Living Assistance Network, where she curated and hosted exhibits of her students’ work. She holds a master’s degree in psychiatric nursing which enhances her knowledge and love of people and their uniqueness.

Martha has contributed her work to various social causes in the community. She has exhibited her work at numerous galleries in Dallas and St. Petersburg, and is a member of Dallas Contemporary, McKinney Avenue Contemporary, St. Pete Arts Alliance, The Morean Art Center, Dali Museum, Artists of Tampa Bay, Gulf Coast Artists’ Alliance, Suntan Art Center, and St. Pete ArtWorks. She recently moved to St. Petersburg where she continues to paint in her studio as well as en plein air. Living on the coast has brought her joy, peace, and beauty which is conveyed with lighter, warmer, and more vibrant use of color in her work.

Her paintings convey emotional intensity, movement and elusive energy. Her work has an ethereal, spiritual, and romantic quality, as she chooses to create a sense of ambiguity, letting elements of nature become indistinct from one another. Sometimes she disregards or distorts aspects of the subject, not being confined by the reference. Her unique energetic style has elements of impressionism and abstract expressionism. She uses multiple layers, washes, glazes, lost and found edges, organic mark making, squeegee and various techniques as she renders landscape and figurative references, at times personified and sometimes obscured into illusion or abstraction. Her goal is “to convey elusive energy and struggle, the pining for beauty and eternal light.”